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  • Anyone training seriously using %HRR rather than %MHR?

     giantAstax updated 6 years, 12 months ago 2 Members · 3 Posts
  • giantAstax

    Member
    9 July 2013 at 12:07 pm

    Just wondered as it seems to make more sense bearing in mind whatever is below your RHR is not available.

  • Gunner

    Member
    9 July 2013 at 7:39 pm

    But isn’t your MHR set, and cannot be changed, where as your RHR is constantly in a state of flux and is dependent on overtraining, tiredness, illnes, state of recovery, etc., etc……………….. 😕 😕 😕 😕

  • giantAstax

    Member
    10 July 2013 at 9:05 am

    But isn’t your MHR set, and cannot be changed, where as your RHR is constantly in a state of flux and is dependent on overtraining, tiredness, illnes, state of recovery, etc., etc……………….. 😕 😕 😕 😕

    MHR (max Heart Rate) you could argue is set but tends to decline with age. Some fitness improvement factors can actually increase MHR slightly.

    RHR (resting heart rate) is largely fitness related and can decline with improved fitness. Mine has dropped from 46 bpm in 2010 to 40 bpm measured just a few weeks ago. The lower it is generally the fitter you are and my doctor tells me following my ECG that I have the RHR of a fit athlete. Which is nice.

    HRR (heart rate reserve) is the difference between the two. The bigger this gap, the fitter you are (or so I believe) and the more capacity you have for performance

    As always your ‘functional’ MHR and RHR will vary as you say according to health, tiredness, conditioning etc but the true values remain constant and need to be measured correctly.

    My RHR is 40 bpm, my MHR is 172 and therefore my HRR is (172-40) 132. I’ve no idea how good/bad or indifferent 132 is though.

    The reason for my question is that 85% of MHR in my case is 146 bpm yet using HRR this figure drops to 80% at 146 bmp. To work at 85% intensity would require a HR of 152 bpm. Remember, we don’t have access to anything below our MHR so in reality all that counts is the bit in between.

    I guess no one is using HRR and I can’t find out much training info on using HRR so the question is somewhat academic. Ah well….. thought I’d ask.

    😀

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