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  • compact chainsets…

     mr-marty-martin updated 11 years, 11 months ago 6 Members · 12 Posts
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  • mr-marty-martin

    Member
    25 February 2009 at 3:54 pm

    ive nver understood all the differance between chainsets ( about from a triple and a double )

    if anyone could name them and then outline the differance or what there all about that would be great 😛

  • grant

    Member
    25 February 2009 at 4:59 pm

    hi marty

    i too have been thinking about going to a compact chainset has i use a triple now .

    i found this you might want to have read tells you all about them

    What is a compact chainset? It’s a chainset with two chainwheels; a “double” as opposed to a “triple”. What makes it different from a traditional double is that it has smaller chainrings. A typical Shimano double has 39/52 rings. A new Shimano compact which will be available in January has 34/50 rings. This chainset, the FC-R700, will come in 165mm, 170mm, 172.5mm and 175mm crank lengths. Good news for those with shorter legs since no one else makes a compact shorter than 170mm.

    The theory behind a compact is that it gives you lower (easier to pedal) gears than a traditional double without having to use a triple. In a September 17 review of the Shimano compact, Cycling Weekly said, “Triple chainsets on road bikes are beginning to look as if they’ve had their day as more and more sports and fitness riders turn to the most elegant solution to overgeared race machine.”

    Marcel Wust, ex-Festina pro bike rider, rode a compact for the first time while reviewing a bike in the October issue of procycling. He wrote, “I ordered this compact chainring set-up, because in the last year or so they have become totally en vogue, and I still didn’t know how they felt….I don’t want to equip my bike with an uglier looking triple chainring that doesn’t shift as comfortably.”

    Caution is in order here, however. If you’re considering a compact for lower gearing, make sure it really can deliver what you expect. Most compacts have a 110 bolt circle diameter (the diameter of a circle through the bolts that connect the chainrings to the chainset). The smallest chainring they can accept is 34 teeth. Shimano’s compact is intended to be used with 10-speed chain, cassette and front derailleur. Shimano 10-speed cassettes do not currently come with a larger cog than 27 teeth, so the lowest gear obtainable will be 33.2 gear inches. For most riders, this may be plenty adequate, but if you’re looking for true low gears, this won’t do it for you. Other manufacturer’s compacts may work with 9-speed systems. This opens up more possibilities, since 9-speed cassettes are made with 34 teeth cogs. Combine this with a 34 on the front and you have a 27 gear inch low. Much better for serious climbing. Or, you may want to test the compatibility of a 10-speed chain on 9-speed cassettes. I don’t think I’m ready to toll the knell yet for the triple chainset.

    10 speeds…good or bad? From my perspective as a designer: not so good in its current state. The 9 speed system gives me a lot of choices in gearing. The 10 speed system (so far) does not. Because both mountain and road components are available in 9 speeds, by judicious choice of components, I can build a road bike with anything from gearing for racing to gearing for loaded touring. But once you decide to build a bike in the 10 speed world, it becomes very difficult to do this. At this time, Shimano has no plans to introduce a 10 speed mountain group. They acknowledge a 10 speed cassette with a 30 tooth cog is a possibility……but it will require manufacturing a new rear derailleur that can accommodate 30 teeth. All credit is due Shimano: their products are fantastic. But sometimes I think they fail to realize just how cyclists really use Shimano components.

    hope this helps

    grant

  • Gunner

    Member
    25 February 2009 at 5:18 pm

    Nice article Grant. Well found 😉

  • Steve Kish

    Member
    25 February 2009 at 5:43 pm

    I actually have a triple compact on my Marin – allows the use of a 20T inner ring. My days of struggling up huge slopes are over with a 16.9-inch bottom gear! 8)

  • mr-marty-martin

    Member
    25 February 2009 at 5:47 pm

    orite, a get it now…

    thanks…

  • tomlevell

    Member
    25 February 2009 at 7:19 pm

    Compacts are for mincers who can’t climb.

    Standard chainsets are for real men who hammer away into a Belgian wind all day on the front.

    Standard chinsets and 12-28 cassettes are for those who are pretending to be real men but need the help up the hills.

    Triples should only be whispered about under your breath.

    ;0)

  • HarryB

    Member
    25 February 2009 at 7:22 pm

    Compacts are for mincers who can’t climb.

    Standard chainsets are for real men who hammer away into a Belgian wind all day on the front.

    Standard chinsets and 12-28 cassettes are for those who are pretending to be real men but need the help up the hills.

    Triples should only be whispered about under your breath.

    ;0)

    Do I detect that this is an attempt at humour?

  • HarryB

    Member
    25 February 2009 at 7:24 pm

    orite, a get it now…

    Could somebody put this into English? 😆 😆 😆 😆 😆 😆

  • Steve Kish

    Member
    25 February 2009 at 9:00 pm

    Compacts are for mincers who can’t climb.

    Tom, it’s as if you know me – spooooky!! 😆

  • mr-marty-martin

    Member
    25 February 2009 at 10:04 pm

    c’mon harry, it’s a forum not a bloody spelling test, give it a rest …

  • tomlevell

    Member
    25 February 2009 at 10:14 pm

    Yeah funny wasn’t it.

  • mr-marty-martin

    Member
    26 February 2009 at 4:00 pm

    my cross bike has one of these normal doubles…

    where there very simaler sizes…

    but yeh i run a mtb-pizza style cassette on the back of mine for cross, as you need them

    tbh i only realy use the top 3 gears in cross, ive allways thought i should takre the rest of, spacer them, and screw the rear mech to save a little weight 😛

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