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  • Do Turbo miles count?

     Gunner updated 11 years, 1 month ago 5 Members · 17 Posts
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  • hugo15

    Member
    28 November 2009 at 6:40 pm

    For those of you who keep a diary of your training rides and also ride a turbo, do you log the miles you do on the turbo and count them towards your annual mileage?

  • HarryB

    Member
    28 November 2009 at 7:28 pm

    Turbo miles should count double in my book.

    Seriously, I no longer take any notice of how many miles or kms I do. Time on the bike is a much better indicator I reckon.

    And seeing as you’ll ask, about 186 hours since September 1st including turbo time

  • hugo15

    Member
    28 November 2009 at 7:36 pm

    Managed an hour on the turbo last night, my longest ever stint 😳 . Actually found that it was easier to keep is steady rather than trying to do intervals as I have always done previously. The session was at level 2 (75% to 85% of Max HR). Feeling quite motivated at the moment.

  • Gunner

    Member
    28 November 2009 at 8:07 pm

    No, they don’t count. 😈

    Not in any way whatsoever. 🙄 🙄

    Turbo training is tough, in my opinion, and who would rather not be outside and riding their bike.

    Therefore turbo training does not count, actually riding actual miles counts, otherwise I could start counting my weight training sessions as miles.

    😉

  • grant

    Member
    28 November 2009 at 9:33 pm

    to be honest i allways log mine down even tho it is only turbo miles

    but any mile is better than no mile .

  • HarryB

    Member
    29 November 2009 at 5:36 am

    Turbo miles on my Tacx are much, much harder than road miles.

    The bloke who won the national hill climb championships this year did ALL of his training on the turbo.

  • hugo15

    Member
    29 November 2009 at 7:31 am

    I log my turbo miles. I was just wondering what everyone else did.

  • HarryB

    Member
    29 November 2009 at 8:30 am

    Steve, the turbo is a fantastic training tool but I think it needs to be used with HR monitor to get the best training effect. I also think there’s stuff you can do on a turbo and stuff you can’t.

    For instance, there is no way I could sit on a turbo for four hours and keep my HR below my 130 cap for base training.

    On the other hand, for endurance sessions where i’m aiming to keep my HR in the 131-141 zone for 90 -120 minutes, the turbo is brilliant. On the road it’s very hard to keep my HR as high as 131 when I’m going downhill or on the flat with the wind behind me. On the turbo it’s very easy to control things.

    At the moment I can’t handle a full shift of that duration on the turbo so I break it up into bearable chunks. Last might I did two endurance sessions of about 50 minutes with a couple of minutes break between them. Allows me to have a slash, change the CD and turn the fan to a lower/higher setting depending on how much I’m suffering.

    The beauty of using the Tacx stuff that I use is that by selecting a RLV (real life video) I can almost mimic a real training ride. The beauty of the Tacx is that I still have to pedal a fair bit on the downhills so I don’t have the problem of my HR dropping too much.

    If I keep an eye on the numbers I can keep in the 131-141 zone for 100% of my training time. Out on the road 85% would be very good going.

    I don’t know why but my nads and backside suffer more on the turbo. On the road I can ride for six hours or more with no discomfort. An hour on the turbo is torture

  • MikeBoro

    Member
    29 November 2009 at 8:46 am

    I don’t know why but my nads and backside suffer more on the turbo. On the road I can ride for six hours or more with no discomfort. An hour on the turbo is torture

    Not just me then. This is my limiting factor on the turbo. Also circulation, which is probably related. I stand every now and then, which doesn’t quite feel right on the turbo. I was thinking that perhaps a different saddle or using my Asos bib shorts on the turbo rather than the cheaper shorts.

  • HarryB

    Member
    29 November 2009 at 9:00 am

    You have Assos shorts? Are you a lottery winner?

    Seriously, I always wear good shorts on the turbo (Assos and others) and it helps but it’s still more uncomfortable than on the road. I used to think it was the heat but I bought the biggest fam I could find and iit’s made no difference

  • Gunner

    Member
    29 November 2009 at 9:27 am

    I stand every now and then, which doesn’t quite feel right on the turbo.

    Same for me, something just not right about standing and pedalling on the turbo……………… 😕 😕

  • hugo15

    Member
    29 November 2009 at 4:28 pm

    Now have a big sheet of paper with the heart rate zones taped to the garage door. Need to be careful, this could be construed as training……………

    Did one of the Spinerval DVDs that Grant copied for me today, “On the Road”, complete with Coach Troy keeping me motivated . It was pretty good TBH and the 50 odd minutes seemed to fly by. Not sure I need to signal to turn while in the garage though 😉 . Hard to keep the HR below 85% at times.

    I think my turbo efforts have been pretty unstructured before, usually involving some sort of warm up and then some unstructured intervals where the pace/duration would change mid programme depending on how I was feeling. Think this is where I might have been falling down. Now trying to do something more structured.

    Out of interest Harry, what percentage of max HR is your 131-141 endurance zone? The programme in Pete Read’s black book has these sessions at 75%-85% of your max, and I just wondered how this compared to the programme you were following.

    Glad it’s not just me that suffers with a numb backside on the turbo 😳 .

  • Gunner

    Member
    29 November 2009 at 5:31 pm

    50 minutes of work on the turbo for me today, the last 40 minutes of that spent at 144 BPM.

    Quite pleased as I was feeling like just resting, but once I got going I felt really good. 😀

  • HarryB

    Member
    29 November 2009 at 5:41 pm

    Out of interest Harry, what percentage of max HR is your 131-141 endurance zone? The programme in Pete Read’s black book has these sessions at 75%-85% of your max, and I just wondered how this compared to the programme you were following..

    Steve, I think this constitutes proper training. Be careful. Real men have Rustler or Men Only calendars on their garage doors not HR bands.

    As for the percentages it depends which formula you use.

    Under the old system my endurance zone is 72-79% or thereabouts by my calculations. I prefer the Karvonen Formula which is heart rate reserve. Using that method my 131-141 endurance is 60-70%.

    When I had my testing done my resting HR was 58-60 across the week before the test. Under testing my max was calculated as 178 (shows how crap the 220-age formula is).

    Garry gave me a sheet with my zones on and the percentages weren’t even on it. Seems as though the Pete Reed stuff is pretty much the same zones. I think most coaches work on similar principals

    I’m gagging to get stuck into the harder sessions but I’ll just have to be patient and wait.

  • Gunner

    Member
    29 November 2009 at 6:06 pm

    Harry, how accurate would this calculator be if you aplied it to your training H/R and zones, near or wildly out………. ❓

    http://www.brianmac.co.uk/hrm1.htm

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