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  • Dropper posts on roadbikes

     giantAstax updated 3 years, 11 months ago 7 Members · 20 Posts
  • Robmet

    Member
    26 July 2016 at 7:10 am

    Slightly unusual but thought provoking anyway.

    I just watched a GCN clip where they experimented with using mtb style droppers on roadbikes with the aim to see if it improved cornering confidence and aero influence on the descents. It looked like they were doing it off the back of Froome (and others) sat on the top tube while peddling to improve speed.

    When they tried it they noted a 10sec/4km improvement while descending and commented how much more confidence they had in the corners. Fairly interesting stuff.

    Now this only really caught my attention because iv just sold a cannondale trigger mtb and took the Thompson dropper off it before it went. The Trigger and my Supersix have the same seatpost size and now I have a dropper in my bits box so im considering chucking it on?

    The key question would be is the weight increase of adding a dropper outweighed by the speed and cornering benefits on the descents?

    Iv got a Cannondale C3 post on there at the moment which weights 300g, the thompson dropper weights 500g, is a 200g increase substantial?

    😯

  • Magnus

    Member
    26 July 2016 at 9:37 am

    Not in my humble opinion. a good poo will more than off sett the weight gain. now if it were rotating mass you would need a good poo and shed a limb. 😯

    deffo a good idea though, got to be worth a try.

  • Robmet

    Member
    26 July 2016 at 9:56 am

    I wanted to put it to good use on my CX bike where I have more than the odd sketchy moment. In my head that was the same size seatpost too, when I actually went to check it was a 30.9 and the cannondales are 31.6, close but not close enough.

    Might put it on tonight for the local club run and see what ridicule I get.

    😆

  • giantAstax

    Member
    26 July 2016 at 10:03 am

    Speaking as a qualified road & time trial coach (as well as for MTB and CX) I would not advocate using a dropper post on either a road or CX bike. You’d be better off on getting some instruction on how to ride better.

  • Robmet

    Member
    26 July 2016 at 10:14 am

    Speaking as a qualified road & time trial coach (as well as for MTB and CX) I would not advocate using a dropper post on either a road or CX bike. You’d be better off on getting some instruction on how to ride better.

    Not really sure what you mean?

    Its fairly common knowledge that on a mtb at least getting your seat out the way aids in descending. CX in some respects is similar in part to mtb so getting the seat out of the way would help with technical or fast descending.

    I agree it would have limited place on a TT bike, but the others are worth exploring? As you say you’re a coach you should be looking at the positives of technology and how to introduce them to exploit any benefits to riders rather than instantly knowing better and dismissing them off the cuff?

    It would also make sense that getting low and out of the wind aids in being aero.

    Imagine if he had a device to drop his seat right down to get the same position but without the drawbacks of being sat on the frame?

    Anyway here’s the vid:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yeEaeY25Amg

  • Attila

    Member
    26 July 2016 at 10:20 am

    Speaking as a qualified road & time trial coach (as well as for MTB and CX) I would not advocate using a dropper post on either a road or CX bike. You’d be better off on getting some instruction on how to ride better.

    could you elaborate on that please?

    I understand that on the Road unless you are consistently doing large descents then the benefits may not be worth it however on a CX bike where you are moving around the bike a lot more surely a dropper is a good idea?

  • Amateur

    Member
    26 July 2016 at 10:26 am

    #justsayin

  • Robmet

    Member
    26 July 2016 at 10:29 am

    Speaking as a qualified road & time trial coach (as well as for MTB and CX) I would not advocate using a dropper post on either a road or CX bike. You’d be better off on getting some instruction on how to ride better.

    could you elaborate on that please?

    I understand that on the Road unless you are consistently doing large descents then the benefits may not be worth it however on a CX bike where you are moving around the bike a lot more surely a dropper is a good idea?

    This guy won and cites some of the benefits he felt when using a dropper on a ‘cross bike. He also has a pretty neat install using the redundant LH shifter as the actuator for the dropper.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2nb4cdewzU

  • Amateur

    Member
    26 July 2016 at 10:30 am

    Rob, I dont know what your issue is, that guy in the pic you posted looks a picture of comfort and control, having your weight that far over the front is totally a good idea when knocking on the door of 60 down some alpine Col

  • Robmet

    Member
    26 July 2016 at 10:46 am

    Exactly,

    These things exist that with a bit of thought or refinement can be used to increase the speed, comfort and safety of cycling.

    The disc brake on roadbikes thing was farcical, every man and his dog accept that disc brakes are a better system than calipers developed last century apart from the Luddite roadies who cast them as the work of the devil.

    I would worry for my safety if I turned up at some die hard CTC or similar meeting on a disc equipped roadbike with 28mm tyres(tubeless), a dropper post & running a 1×11 drivetrain, I would probably be burned on a pile of fruit scones and rule books.

    They will of been the same guys that got offended last year by me passing them on my mtb in a cross race.

    Not that the mtb’ers are much better these days, they seem to be at the other end of the scale and if you’re not rocking with the latest inventions then equal amounts of disdain are cast upon thee.

    The looks and comments I got at the last XC race for being on a 26’er were pretty funny.

  • Magnus

    Member
    26 July 2016 at 10:55 am

    Steve Kish leaves and we get an interesting thread to mull over. 🙄 🙄

  • Richard A Thackeray

    Member
    27 July 2016 at 9:26 am

    Personally I’m not sure about this either?

    I raced MTB for a few years (circa 1990 -1996) & Cyclo-Cross too (same years, roughly, then again 2007-2009, & again last year)

    I remember some kind of device being on sale in the 90s, back then it was generally a strong spring that clamped to the seat-pin & the clamp-bolt position

    As the QR was operated, as the rider sat down, it lowered the saddle under the weight

    Conversely, upon taking weight off the saddle, & re-operating the QR, the saddle rose to the Pre-set height

    Upon initially reading this thread, I tried to think back, to if l’d seen anyone use one, & l can’t

    And, certainly not in CX, it’d be easily spotted

    Don’t forget, CX riders cope with rough terrain too, some of the sections of the Three Peaks Cyclo-Cross would make some full-suspension riders think about them

    Still, it’s your choice

    As for the riders who drop themselves behind the saddle, & have issues reseating themselves, that tends to be due to the chamois pad getting caught on the rear edge of the saddle (or baggy shorts, on MTBers)

  • Richard A Thackeray

    Member
    27 July 2016 at 9:51 am

    #justsayin

    😆 🙄

    Not really, or we’d still be on steel bikes & hub gears

    Wait!!!!!, some still do (the trendy people on cro-mo framed ‘fixies’)

    Seriously;

    Not in chronological order, just as I think

    Clipless pedals?

    Circa late 50s?, then LOOK got on the job in 80’s

    Bernard Hinault won the T de F with them, & everyone wanted them

    Indexed gears?

    Accuracy

    STI shifting?

    Possibly the best contribution?

    No need to remove a hand to change gear – try climbing out of saddle, & prretending to reach a down-tube shifter………….

    Electronic shifting?

    Mavic announced this in the early 90’s

    It worked, but was too far ahead of its time (but Boardman used it in the 1997 TdeF)

    Shimano got it right, but the promised ”auto shifting’ based on cadence/incline?!?!

    As for offering electronic hub-gears!, why?

    Suspension?

    Recently, various manufacturers have introduced elastomer systems (Tek, Specialised, Pinarello) for comfort

    Greg Lemond rode the 1993 Paris-Roubaix, on a pair of custom-built Rock-Shox, l think he used them the year after too?

    Just a few thoughts….

    That said, l am a bit of a ‘Techno-Luddite’

    I don’t want Di2, I’m happy with the (mechanical) Ultegra on my Gran Fondo, it’s light-action & good enough for me (cheaper too, if l need replacement parts)

    I was happy without suspension, when l raced MTB, even though my bike manufacturer (Pace Research) did offer their own bouncy forks whilst l owned it

    I did try sets at the workshops, near Haworth, & team-bikes too

    I may, though, when the time comes, replace my (blue Ribble) work/training bike with a disced equivilant

    If only for the reduced effect of pothole damage to rims, & more consistent wet-weather braking (dry is good enough with well set-up rim brakes – which are already a giant disc anyway)

  • Amateur

    Member
    27 July 2016 at 12:12 pm

    Ha, they are all valid points to be fair, I aint beefing its just a bit of fun, mostly driven by the vitriol spouted by some about recent innovations in road bikes (disks etc).

    I guess with a more established sport institutionalized opinions are more prevalent, along with a fear of change, and a lot of MTB is as bad when it comes to new things

    I remember the dropper you are on about, it was called a Height Right, you can still get them on ebay. The modern day equiv are markedly more developed, its literally one button on the handle bar for the seat to go up or down. Obviously they weigh more but in a world of marginal gains I think there must be some benefit to descending with the seat down?

  • Amateur

    Member
    27 July 2016 at 12:13 pm

    Also, and speaking as someone with a mostly DH MTB background, you lot are nutters for riding bikes at speed down roads in the rain with skinny tyres and caliper brakes. I had a road bike once and rode it down a hill, it scared seven bells out of me

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