Find answers, ask questions, and connect with our
community around the world.

Forums Forums The Workshop Mountain Bike Chain Fitting

  • Mountain Bike Chain Fitting

     Steve Kish updated 11 years, 5 months ago 6 Members · 14 Posts
  • Stri

    Member
    20 January 2009 at 5:55 pm

    Hi there,

    A friend of mine has a good mountain bike but it doesn’t have a chain. I’ve spotted chains on ebay for less then £10.

    The problem is (as I understand it) is that I need a specialist tool to remove some of the links in order to make the chain fit.

    Obviously I don’t want to fork out (no pun intended) for a tool which I’ll only use once. Is there any way around this problem?

    Cheers

    Stri

  • Gunner

    Member
    20 January 2009 at 6:43 pm

    Yes, you can buy a chain that has a powerlink connector and no need for “special tools”, it has a joining plate which holds the chain together very effectively.

    The only problem is if I remember correctly, you may need to trim the chain down to the correct length for your bike, which may involve needing a “special tool” to remove the additional links…………………..

    have a look here;

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=190269218059&cguid=c3b9268311c0a0e204c64986ffdd6ca5

  • Stri

    Member
    20 January 2009 at 6:48 pm

    Hi, thanks for the reply.

    So your answer is I will need the tool to change the amount of links or does this power link remove the need for this?

    Cheers

    This is from wiki

    Some newer chain designs, such as Shimano and Campagnolo 10-speed chains, require a special replacement pin to be used when installing or reinstalling a separated chain. An alternative to this process is to install a master link, such as a SRAM Power Link or a Wipperman Connex.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_chain

  • Gunner

    Member
    20 January 2009 at 7:01 pm

    Do you know how many links the standard chain fitted to this bike would have had. You could then buy a chain with that number of links complete with a power connector.

    Alternatively you could just buy a chain tool.

    They can be picked up very, very cheaply, about £2 😉

    Here’s a pricey one in Halfords……….

    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_storeId_10001_catalogId_10151_productId_177325_langId_-1_categoryId_165532

  • Stri

    Member
    20 January 2009 at 7:10 pm

    Do you know how many links the standard chain fitted to this bike would have had. You could then buy a chain with that number of links complete with a power connector.

    Nah, I’ve not seen the bike. My friend tells me it’s decent but it’s in bits in one of his cupboards somewhere.

    Alternatively you could just buy a chain tool.

    They can be picked up very, very cheaply, about £2 😉

    Here’s a pricey one in Halfords……….

    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_storeId_10001_catalogId_10151_productId_177325_langId_-1_categoryId_165532

    Yeah, a lot cheaper than I thought but I’m a very tight budget.

    Thanks for your help anyway

  • bry5

    Member
    20 January 2009 at 9:30 pm

    Its a fair cert that any new chain you buy will need a couple of links removing to fit properly, the powerlink is only to join the two ends together, so your still going to need a chain rivet tool.

    I don’t know anyway of getting by without one, though you could buy the chain from your local bike store and ask them to fit it at the same time which might save money, who knows, you might get lucky and they might have an old one hanging about.

    Word of warning though, not to put you off, but new chains and old cassettes do not go well together, you might find the chain slipping a lot.

    Bry

  • Stri

    Member
    20 January 2009 at 9:31 pm

    Sounds like sound advice, thanks fella.

  • Steve Kish

    Member
    20 January 2009 at 10:46 pm

    You can remove the links once-only with a punch and hammer but I’d always recommend a good quality chain tool. Punch out both pins just a few mm rather than trying to punch out one all the way.

    I never have a clip-in link to my chain when I fit them. You can open and close them quite easily using a good tool that screw-butts onto the back of the rivet.

    With correct use, should last for y-e-a-r-s. 8)

  • Stri

    Member
    20 January 2009 at 11:04 pm

    Thanks for the advice.

    I’ve decided I’m going to get a chain from a local shop and see if I can get them to fit it as part of the price. I think that’s what should work out cheapest.

    No more advice needed unless you feel my life would be made complete by your wisdom.

    Thanks all for taking the time to reply

    Stri

  • Abzz

    Member
    20 January 2009 at 11:25 pm

    No more advice needed unless you feel my life would be made complete by your wisdom.

    Stri

    😆 OK Stri how about “Life may be more akin to a series of races than a single marathon. You can lose a race here or there, as long as you win in one contest, in one area. All the struggles you endured will become a prized investment in your own person.”

    Live long and prosper 😉

  • Stri

    Member
    20 January 2009 at 11:35 pm

    I like it 🙂

    I think I’ll use something similar when I find some woman retarded enough to have my children. 🙂

    Peace and goodwill to you all

  • Steve Kish

    Member
    21 January 2009 at 9:27 pm

    Nanu nanu …. ❓ 😛

  • paul 4g63

    Member
    31 January 2009 at 6:07 pm

    Just to add, I wouldnt look at a chain tool as a one off device anyway. Even if you have a powerlink and need to trim the chain down to size its always good to have one just in case you ever have a link snap when out and about. You never know when such a device could be needed.

  • Steve Kish

    Member
    31 January 2009 at 7:49 pm

    There are basically two grades of chain tool out there:-

    The cheap ones like the old Cyclo, as shown here:-

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/CHAIN-RIVETT-EXTRACTOR-CHAIN-LINK-SPLITER-CHAIN-TOOL_W0QQitemZ290291896060QQihZ019QQcategoryZ109122QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    …. and the good ‘uns like this:-

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Super-B-Chain-Rivet-Extractor-Tool-RRP-12-95_W0QQitemZ200304941299QQihZ010QQcategoryZ109122QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    The diffo is that the good one has a hollow screw fitting at the back that tightens against the rear of the link making it virtually impossible to break, as shown at the top here;-

    http://images.marketplaceadvisor.channeladvisor.com/fullView.asp?id=65227956&fc=1&img=http://images.marketworks.com/hi/55/54565/chain_splitter_5.jpg

    ‘El Cheapo’ relies in the strength of the lugs to hold the chain in place – I’ve broken about 12 of these over the years!

    Not much diffo in the price!! 8)

Viewing 1 - 14 of 14 posts
Original Post
0 of 0 posts June 2018
Now

New Report

Close