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  • new tyres for trek 4500-2009 model

     Doogs updated 11 years, 10 months ago 8 Members · 31 Posts
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  • Doogs

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 6:04 pm

    Hi folks..

    sorry if this question has been asked before..

    I am still a MTB noob of sorts, i normally ride the red and black routes at Kirroughtree 7 stanes..

    I am thinking of upgrading my trek’s factory fitted skinny tyres (26 x 2.1) for a pair of Bontrager Big Earls 26 x 2.8, I need to know if these will sit safely and snugly on the factory fitted rims..

    Wheels-

    Shimano M475 disc hubs; Bontrager Camino, 32-hole rims w/eyelets, machined sidewalls

    Tyres

    Bontrager Jones ACX, 26×2.1″; 27 tpi

    I appreciate any info that any of you good folks can provide me with..

    T.I.A

  • Gunner

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 6:32 pm

    I think the first question you may need to consider is whether the 2.8 will fit snugly into your frame/fork clearances.

    What model Trek are you riding, and what is the clearance like at the moment with your 2.1’s, especially near your bottom bracket/chainstay joint, and what about when your tyres pick up mud ❓

    Oops, sorry, didn’t see you had put the model in the thread title. 😳 😳

  • mr-marty-martin

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 6:36 pm

    yeh it sounds abit unrealistic of a option tbh 😕

  • Doogs

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 6:46 pm

    and what is the clearance like at the moment with your 2.1’s, especially near your bottom bracket/chainstay joint, and what about when your tyres pick up mud ❓

    good point… I did say i was a noob… i have measured the clearance from the outside edge of the rear tyre to the inside edge of the bottom bracket/chainstay joint and the clearance is 13mm on either side.

    there is also enough clearance on the front forks as well. but now you mention the fact that the tyres will pick up mud then I think it would be a better option to go for 26 x 2.5 tyres.

    or does anyone have a better suggestion as to tyre size….

  • mr-marty-martin

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 6:48 pm

    just wondering why do you want tyres that wide??/

  • Doogs

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 7:04 pm

    just wondering why do you want tyres that wide??/

    my thinking is that the wider the tyre footprint then surely it should mean more grip……or is that a fallacy 😕 ❓

  • BigBadJohn118

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 7:13 pm

    i think in that case it just depends how good the big fatty realy is.

    if you put a low of the range 2.5 against a top of the range 2.1 the 2.1 will be the best, I think anyway.

    just my opinion 😛

  • Dale

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 7:14 pm

    just wondering why do you want tyres that wide??/

    my thinking is that the wider the tyre footprint then surely it should mean more grip……or is that a fallacy 😕 ❓

    No that would probably work out, more tyre touching the ground isn’t there.

  • mr-marty-martin

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 7:20 pm

    yeh but you must be going seiously fast to need that much more grip that you need something bigger than a 2.5

  • BigBadJohn118

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 7:28 pm

    the bigger the tyre is the more rubber ther is doing nothing coz its just the center tred gripping the ground on the straight, then when you are turning cornors you will only be using half of the side tred 😯

    am i rite/Dale/Gunner , anyone ?

    if i am rite in a way about the side Tred, then the only way u would probs use it is if ur Decking cornors 😆

  • SeanO

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 7:30 pm

    2.5 would be OTT for that bike.

    Try some Maxxis High Rollers available in XC 2.1 or 2.35 downhill versions. You could go for a tubeless conversion kit, allowing you to run lower tyre pressures, if you want more grip. Using low pressures to get more grip on normal innertubes at Kirroughtree with get you many pinch flats.

    I’d just stick with 2.1 and try and get a sticky compound tyre for the better grip.

  • Gunner

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 7:37 pm

    Don’t know how convenient this might be for you, but as a “noob” maybe it might be useful.

    Why not go down to your local bike shops and have a look at some of the bikes in there and the tyres that are on them as well as just the tyres that are for sale. Maybe look at some 2.3″ tyres, I’m pretty sure you’ll find that they look quite big compared to your existing 2.1″ tyres.

    You won’t have any problems fitting tyres to your existing wheels, like I said, the issue is more about comfortable clearance.

    😉

  • Dale

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 7:46 pm

    the bigger the tyre is the more rubber ther is doing nothing coz its just the center tred gripping the ground on the straight, then when you are turning cornors you will only be using half of the side tred 😯

    am i rite/Dale/Gunner , anyone ?

    if i am rite in a way about the side Tred, then the only way u would probs use it is if ur Decking cornors 😆

    I can see were your coming from John, but I don’t think it works like that. I’m going to have to get Googling now haha 😛

  • Dale

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 7:51 pm

    The wider tire has more surface to grab the road before it slips laterally, so it gives you better handling.

    Wider tires are also more prone to hydroplaning, so on a wet surface, they aren’t necessarily better.

    Thats from one website, this is from another.. not sure this is totally true though:

    The reason for tread pattern on a tyre is to provide a channel along which water can be displaced. If there is a layer of water between the tyre and the tamac, then you can aquaplane and the wheel will slide out. Let’s get this straight – Bicycles DON’T Aquaplane. Cars and Motorcycles have a large contact patch where the tyre touches the road, and their weight is distributed over this so there is a low pressure applied. Bicycles have a very small contact patch, so the pressure applied is much greater. This pressure alone is enough to displce the water, avoiding the need for a tread pattern. If you do have a tread pattern, then you have less contact rubber. Instead of thinking “tread” think “gaps”. Get a slick tyre and you’ll have more rubber in contact with the road. If you want more grip, don’t think “tread”, think “wider”

  • Gunner

    Member
    8 February 2009 at 7:54 pm

    Would not the tyre pressure be the greatest governing factor in deciding the amount of rubber contact regardless of tyre size……….. ❓

    😕 😕

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