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  • Puncture Prevention

     Steve Kish updated 11 years, 6 months ago 3 Members · 12 Posts
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  • onedego

    Member
    1 February 2009 at 12:12 pm

    Hi guys! I’m new to the forum, but not to mountain biking… well, the recent age of mountain biking, yes. I haven’t been out in the hills for a good while, but used to frequent the lake district.

    Anyway, my fiance (who’s never been out in the hills), has just got herself a nice mountain bike, and we want to get out and about on them, seeing the world, and hopefully do a sponsored event in the near future.

    My question is this.. Obviously, nobody wants to get a puncture, but everyone anticipates it by carrying spare tubes, repair kits and bits and peices with them… but is there a good way to prevent that soul destroying puncture from ruining your day?

    I’ve seen products like Slime (goo in tubes), Skinz (plastic tyre liners) and stuff like that, but what, really, is the best option?

    Please help!

    Andy

  • Steve Kish

    Member
    1 February 2009 at 12:25 pm

    I used to get loads of punctures but am now of the opinion that if you get a good pair of tyres that are easy to remove and replace, a CO2 pump, plastic tyre levers (don’t use metal ones on alloy rims!!!!!) and a couple of spare tubes, you’ll be able to change easily enough without disrupting your ride.

    I have a small trick that lets me find if there is a flint in the tyre easily. I mark the inner tube with a bit of paint on the side that has the Q/R lever and put the brand name above the valve on the same side. So, when you find where the hole is in the tube, you’ll be able to find (within a couple of inches) where the thorn or flint penetrated the tyre and remove it if needed.

    I’ve yet to find a very puncture resistant tyre that doesn’t feel like it’s made of stone!

    On my road bike I have Bontrager Race-X-Lite Hardcase (recently replacing my Conti Ultra Sport)

    Off-road bike has Bontrager Road Warrior 1.5 for the road and Panaracer Cinder 2.25/2.1 for trails.

    HTH

  • Gunner

    Member
    1 February 2009 at 1:25 pm

    Nothing can beat having good quality tyres that offer a good level of puncture resistance coupled with good, reliable inner tubes.

    If your just leisure riding and prepared to accept the weight that “Slime” would involve, then I’d rather have that weight in good tyres and tubes.

    Remember, “Slime” doesn’t stop punctures, it merely offers up a temporary sealant to the inner tubes hole, and thats providing you put the “Slime” in properly………….

  • Steve Kish

    Member
    1 February 2009 at 3:18 pm

    Gunner, I’ve heard about the Slime stuff. How long can you have it sloshing around inside an inner tube before it loses it’s effectiveness?

  • Gunner

    Member
    1 February 2009 at 3:28 pm

    Gunner, I’ve heard about the Slime stuff. How long can you have it sloshing around inside an inner tube before it loses it’s effectiveness?

    I don’t really know how long it lasts as I would not use it personally. I just know that you need to follow the instructions carefully to get it into your tube, fairly simple, otherwise it can set before it effectively coats the whole surface of the inside of the tube.

    Problem is, how many people read the instructions properly before doing anything these days 😕 😕

  • Steve Kish

    Member
    1 February 2009 at 5:32 pm

    Thing that makes me wonder is that with the centrifugal force of the rim, it will coat the outer edge of the tube OK but why won’t it dry when it’s suspended in normal compressed air, the gas that it’s supposed to react with when it comes out of the hole? 😕

  • onedego

    Member
    1 February 2009 at 6:58 pm

    thanks guys! So i’ll give the slime and all that lot a miss and get a couple of spare tubes… my MTB actually came with good tyres… I’ve got a Muddyfox Meltdown SE, which I bought based on it’s spec, on what I could remember from my older days…

    Had a few good rides on it thusfar!

    I didn’t know you could get a CO2 pump! Brilliant idea! They think of everything these days!

  • Steve Kish

    Member
    1 February 2009 at 7:44 pm

    Pointer here to eBay for one:-

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Truflo-Micro-CO2-Cycle-Pump-Cartridges-Cycling_W0QQitemZ140289329563QQihZ004QQcategoryZ22691QQssPageNameZWD1VQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    … and spare cart’s

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/co2-Threaded-16gm-cartridges-x-10-c02_W0QQitemZ150278104331QQihZ005QQcategoryZ109122QQssPageNameZWD1VQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItemQQ_trksidZp1638Q2em118Q2el1247

    I usually carry 3-4 cart’s, just in case. They’re very light and you’ll bless the day you bought them when you have to inflate a tyre in the rain!

    Careful, though. Although they inflate a whole tyre in about 2 seconds, the container is frosty after that and needs a glove or rag to hold it with to remove.

    Onedego, if you’re not too sure of how to do it, try just removing both wheels and taking the inner tube out and replacing it in the comfort of your home rather than finding out how to do it on the road.

  • onedego

    Member
    1 February 2009 at 8:50 pm

    I notice that there appears to be no valve on the device though. How would you know when to switch it off?

    I know all about the freezing properties of CO2. I used to play paintball in the CO2 days, and saw people quite often getting bits of people stuck to cylinders… hehe. Compressed air is very similar too (I’m a SCUBA Diver as well)

  • Steve Kish

    Member
    1 February 2009 at 10:48 pm

    The valve is the red thingy on the top – unscrews to open. 😛 Allows it to be opened very slightly; more precise than the trigger type.

  • onedego

    Member
    2 February 2009 at 12:13 am

    Sorry, i meant guage, so you can see how much you’ve put in there – brain like a peanut this evening

  • Steve Kish

    Member
    2 February 2009 at 9:34 am

    Sorry, i meant guage, so you can see how much you’ve put in there – brain like a peanut this evening

    No gauge. I don’t know of a hand pump that does have one and TBH, one cartridge inflates any tyre enough to get you home easily.

    In case you can’t tell from the photo, this is a very small item that easily sits in the palm of your hand. The cartridge is about three inches long.

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