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  • Removing a stuck bolt – HELP!!!

     n3ver3nder updated 11 years, 6 months ago 4 Members · 13 Posts
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  • n3ver3nder

    Member
    9 July 2009 at 5:31 pm

    As some of you who read my previous thread on the matter may know, I recently got a cheap frame off ebay with some judy’s attached for £23, which I thought was an awesome deal, but there is a catch!

    The stem fitted (a titec el norte) came with one allen key bolt fitted in the lower of the two bolt holes. Apparently the bolt is made of playdough or something, as the head of the bolt has sheared and won’t grip the correct size allen key. It’s also semi cut in half – the previous owner has obviously used a hacksaw to try and sever the bolt instead, but given up.

    What I’ve tried so far;

    – Hammering in the next size up allen key. Managed to get the bolt to grip but it sheared the head again.

    – Using a hacksaw, but the bit that holds the blade prevents the blade from getting deep enough in the gap in the clamp to reach the bolt.

    – Holding the hacksaw blade in a wrap of cloth and duct tape to make a ‘handle’ at one end, but this stops any pressure being put on the end of blade doing the cutting, and tilting it back to apply more pressure will end up with the steering tube of forks getting cut.

    Won’t be able to get pics up to demonstrate my dilema until Monday, or indeed be able to do anything with the bike until Monday.

    I need to get the forks seperated from the frame sharpish, as I need the money from re-sale to go towards a new rear hub and the cost of a wheel build.

    So chaps, any ideas? I’ve been contemplating getting a Dremel for a while, would I be able to get an attachment for that, that can cut bolts? Maybe something lower-tech, would a chisel work?

  • Steve Kish

    Member
    9 July 2009 at 11:30 pm

    Dremel has circular blades that may well score the steering column. I’d consider a reciprocating chisel with the tip suitably ground down to just touch the bolt without damaging the stem or steerer. Local garage with a decent compressor may help.

  • matt.will

    Member
    10 July 2009 at 7:34 am

    You can buy a hacksaw which only clamps the blade at one end, you might end up snapping the blade but you should be able to get enough pressure to cut a groove in the head of the bolt. Put a flat headed screwdriver in the groove and unscrew this way. Failing that, drill the bolt with a bit slightly smaller than the bolt shaft and it should fall to pieces and drop out.

  • n3ver3nder

    Member
    10 July 2009 at 9:40 am

    I don’t have a drill strong enough to that. Would it work using a drill bit with a Dremel? I’d assume they’re more powerful (than the cordless drill I’ve got anyways), as they run from mains..

    Think I’ll try the chisel 1st though.

  • matt.will

    Member
    10 July 2009 at 12:22 pm

    A cordless will do it.

  • Dale

    Member
    10 July 2009 at 12:32 pm

    What you need is an “Easyout”, you drill a small hole into then use an Easyout in the drill to grip and unscrew it. 🙂

    Also, to make it easier, if you give the bolt a tap with a hammer because this “shocks the threads” to make it easier to unscrew.

  • n3ver3nder

    Member
    10 July 2009 at 12:35 pm

    I’ve already tried with a cordless, it won’t do it. Is it likely to be more to do with the quality of the drill or the drill bit.

    Dale can you link me one of these ‘Easyout’ mabob’s? I’ve got no idea what you’re talking about :s

  • Dale

    Member
    10 July 2009 at 12:44 pm
  • Steve Kish

    Member
    10 July 2009 at 4:57 pm

    I’d bet that an ‘Easy-Out’ will just chew it up more. 🙁

  • Dale

    Member
    10 July 2009 at 5:44 pm

    Not if your careful, rather than put it in a drill you’d be better of using something like a die stock so you can be more careful not to chew it up.

    Whatever you do, make sure you take it slow!!

  • n3ver3nder

    Member
    10 July 2009 at 10:55 pm

    Well they have a flat bit on t’other end don’t they? I’ll just use an adjustable spanner on it. Take it real slow. I’ll let you know how it goes, gonna purchase this set of easyouts and cobalt drill bits I’ve seen, and see if that works.

  • Dale

    Member
    11 July 2009 at 10:00 am

    Well they have a flat bit on t’other end don’t they? I’ll just use an adjustable spanner on it. Take it real slow. I’ll let you know how it goes, gonna purchase this set of easyouts and cobalt drill bits I’ve seen, and see if that works.

    Yeh they do, might find it a bit tricky to get started with a spanner but once its gripped you should be fine 🙂

  • n3ver3nder

    Member
    16 July 2009 at 6:39 pm

    Didn’t even need to use the easyout! I drilled the bolt until it was thin enough to chisel through with a flatblade screwdriver. The head side of the bolt fell straight out, as that side of the clamp wasn’t threaded, and used the drill to rotate the other half of the bolt (the bit stuck in the threaded side of the clamp) from the opposite end.

    So the stem is savable too, and that’s going on eBay, and the forks are already sold 🙂

    Cheers for all the input guys!

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