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  • Should I be worried? High Heart Rate.

     olddude updated 6 years, 3 months ago 7 Members · 9 Posts
  • lloydie63

    Member
    9 October 2013 at 5:16 pm

    I’ve just turned 50 , I’m OK MTB on the flat but when I hit a hill I’m really struggling, my mates seemingly fly up the very same hill.

    Now, I’m asthmatic but it is under control and I have a peakflow of only 370-400 ( apparently scar tissue on my lungs resricting my lungs expanding through using inhalers for 47 years all this told to me by my asthma nurse)

    So recently I bought a heart rate monitor and the last couple of ride have shown a peak of 178 bpm and an average of 157 bpm for 1 hour 50 mins,

    The average seems very high to me over that period of time.

    My resting rate is in the low 60’s.

    I’m due an annual review by my GP in a few weeks should I be concerned and bring the review forward?

  • Gunner

    Member
    9 October 2013 at 6:45 pm

    Firstly, your average heart rate is a pretty useless figure and not really that important, more important is your max heart rate figures on a ride.

    I’m OK MTB on the flat but when I hit a hill I’m really struggling,

    This would more than likely suggest that you need to practice your technique and develop your hill climbing ability than there being any other type of problem, also have you considered your power to weight ratio in comparison to your mates.

    My resting rate is in the low 60’s.

    Generally, the lower your Resting Heart Rate the fitter you are, perhaps an example could be, I am 52 and have a RHR of 48 BPM, thus could your fitness be improved you might want to ask yourself, could you work to reduce your own personal RHR.

    Now, I’m asthmatic but it is under control and I have a peakflow of only 370-400

    Me too, recently diagnosed though, but I reckon I have been for the past 30 years as I’ve always struggled to breathe, now on 3 inhalers, I’m still able to perform well in sportives, get some KOM’s on Strava segments, and ride 100 miles with relative ease.

    So recently I bought a heart rate monitor and the last couple of ride

    The benefits of HRM ownership are more a long term thing than a quick shock to the system. You need to work out your training zones, threshold levels, etc., and work to training within these zones so as to develop areobic and anaerobic efficiency, otherwise having a HRM is pretty pointless………………..

    Plenty of advice about HRM zones etc., on the road bike section. 😉

  • the last starfighter

    Member
    9 October 2013 at 8:10 pm

    I think it’s probably not wise to compare yourself to friends. Naturally we’re all different. It comes easier to some than it does to others, and of course some work at it harder than others.

    A better indicator would be how you feel yourself. If there was a sudden drop in your fitness, then that might be a cause for concern. If you’re feeling the same as you always have, then I dare say you have nothing to worry about.

  • marcbrown46

    Member
    10 October 2013 at 7:52 am

    I think it’s probably not wise to compare yourself to friends. Naturally we’re all different. It comes easier to some than it does to others, and of course some work at it harder than others.

    A better indicator would be how you feel yourself. If there was a sudden drop in your fitness, then that might be a cause for concern. If you’re feeling the same as you always have, then I dare say you have nothing to worry about.

    Very True !!! don’t compare yourself to your friends its how you feel, your resting hear rate is good, sure all oue heart rates increase a lot when we undertake physical activities its just if they are over a sustained period that a high heart rate can cause more issues, once rested if its aboyt 80-90 that;s an indicator of how unfit you are !!

  • lloydie63

    Member
    10 October 2013 at 5:21 pm

    Cheers all, Like I said I’m off for an annual asthma review in a few weeks, I’ll mention it but wont bring the date forward.

  • legolam

    Member
    13 October 2013 at 2:45 pm

    Maximum, minimum and average heart rates are all very individual and the actual numbers mean very little in terms of fitness or health. If you are otherwise well when exerting yourself, ie no chest pain or excessive breathlessness, then I wouldn’t worry.

    Best wishes,

    Hannah (cardiologist)

  • lloydie63

    Member
    13 October 2013 at 4:52 pm

    Maximum, minimum and average heart rates are all very individual and the actual numbers mean very little in terms of fitness or health. If you are otherwise well when exerting yourself, ie no chest pain or excessive breathlessness, then I wouldn’t worry.

    Best wishes,

    Hannah (cardiologist)

    I thanks for the reply, I do get very breathless on climbs but I put that down to my peakflow which has never got above 400 Should be around 600l/min

  • andywatson

    Member
    13 October 2013 at 6:11 pm

    I wouldn’t worry about that rate either.

    If for reassurance/ comparison you need another old fart’s figures:

    About 20 years ago when Polars first came out I could get mine above 200 . I was 38 at the time.

    When I was about 50 I could still get 190.

    At the time I was doing half marathons in under 1-20

    The above 2 examples were when doing hill reps running ie I was well warmed up and really killing myself up steep hills.

    Believe me, I was gasping for air big time.

    My RHR is about 55.

    I’m now 58 and haven’t checked it lately but I’m still alive. I had an ecg recently and no-one said I’d wrecked myself – well not my heart anyway.

    My guess is that you are fine.

  • olddude

    Member
    30 March 2014 at 4:19 pm

    I wouldn’t worry about that rate either.

    If for reassurance/ comparison you need another old fart’s figures:

    About 20 years ago when Polars first came out I could get mine above 200 . I was 38 at the time.

    When I was about 50 I could still get 190.

    At the time I was doing half marathons in under 1-20

    The above 2 examples were when doing hill reps running ie I was well warmed up and really killing myself up steep hills.

    Believe me, I was gasping for air big time.

    My RHR is about 55.

    I’m now 58 and haven’t checked it lately but I’m still alive. I had an ecg recently and no-one said I’d wrecked myself – well not my heart anyway.

    My guess is that you are fine.

    This^.

    My RHR is around 60 – I’m 64.

    I’ve always had a half-decent fitness level, but lost a lot of weight (14 Kg) in three weeks or so last year due to a close bereavement. The weight lost was muscle, not fat.

    So a year on I feel healthy enough to start pushing myself again, although I never stopped walking the dogs twice a day, which has maintained a low core fitness level.

    I did my first short off-road ascent yesterday, First time was fine, second time my heart was really going. Third time I paced myself and was fine. Today I did it twice and was fine both times.

    The message is to pace yourself, and don’t worry about high heart rates, but look at how quickly you recover.

    Shorter recovery times mean better fitness levels.

    It is a fact that as we age our recovery rates (from anything) do take longer.

    Doesn’t mean we can’t do what we could 20 years ago. Just means we take longer to get back to normal :).

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