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  • Truing the tyre, not the wheel?

     BMR updated 11 years, 8 months ago 6 Members · 9 Posts
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  • miggeth

    Member
    27 August 2009 at 8:42 am

    I just bought some really light inner tubes, knocked over 200 grams off the weight of my bike, but they cause the tyre to sit as if the wheel is buckled.

    I powdered the tube, put WD40 where the wheel meets the tyre but it won’t go. So, instead of truing by measuring from the wheel, I measured from the tyre instead. Now the tyre is perfectly true but the wheel is slightly buckled. I figured this would be best because it’s the tyre that touches the ground, and I hate riding and seeing my tyres wobbling.

    I thought I could feel a wobble when going above 20mph but I might be imagining it, but is there any problem with doing this do you think? Will it shake anything loose?

  • freetime101

    Member
    27 August 2009 at 10:53 am

    I got some tyres by post, when they arrived they were twisted to fit in the package. This meant they sat wonky on the wheel.

    I solved it by pumping the tyres up ridiculously high (65psi i think) leaving them over night then dropping the pressure down to normal (30-35psi).

    Worked for me 🙂

  • tomlevell

    Member
    27 August 2009 at 11:01 am

    The wheel should be as near true as possible. Remember the tyre deforms your wheel doesn’t (by any amount that is significant)

    The tyre doesn’t really matter offroad. You may notice on the road.

    High pressure is one way to get the bead to seat properly or try it at a lower pressure and massage the tyre about to get the bead to fit correctly. Not all tyres are actually made straight although the only ones I’ve seen that don’t seem to seat correctly/straight are a Bontrager and a Kenda.

  • miggeth

    Member
    27 August 2009 at 11:27 am

    These are Maxxis Ignitor, they sat properly with the previous tubes, but these new continental lights are much narrower and must have to stretch a lot to fill the tyre, even though they say they fit the tyre size.

    That must be how they save weight, by using less material and making it stretch.

    I’ll try manhandling the tyre at a low pressure to get it right, I didn’t think of that. I just don’t like spending an hour getting my wheels perfectly true only to have the tyre making it look buckled.

    See how I get on.

  • miggeth

    Member
    28 August 2009 at 1:50 pm

    😳 Bloody hell! That’s a lot of pumping. Sorted them out finally, trued the wheels back up, rubbed baby powder (not WD40 Steve :P) all over the beads, pumped them up to about 70PSI with my own two arms and let them down again.

    What a hassle, those 200 grams saved seem kind of measly now.

  • badblood

    Member
    28 August 2009 at 3:02 pm

    What a hassle, those 200 grams saved seem kind of measly now.

    I can save that much weight by having a good dump before I ride!!! 😀

  • miggeth

    Member
    28 August 2009 at 6:45 pm

    It’s noticable under acceleration, less rotational weight. Top speed doesn’t seem to be affected though.

  • Antimus

    Member
    1 September 2009 at 3:24 pm

    What a hassle, those 200 grams saved seem kind of measly now.

    I can save that much weight by having a good dump before I ride!!! 😀

    nice!

  • BMR

    Member
    1 September 2009 at 4:31 pm

    With tyres thats been folded, I put an old innertube in it and blow it up without the wheel and leave it a couple of days first.

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